Welcome to CWCOA


About CWCOA

Colorado Wildlife Control Operators Association: 

“Providing Solutions to Colorado’s Nuisance Wildlife Problems”

CWCOA is a mutual benefit, non-profit, incorporated state trade association whose mission is to help individuals, businesses and agencies in the wildlife damage control industry to resolve human/wildlife conflicts through cooperation, education, training, influence, professionalism, and service.


Thank you, everyone, who attended for a successful CWCOA 15th Annual Conference!


Membership and Conference Purchase Options

Fill out and submit the membership application.

CWCOA MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION

Payment Options

Pay via Check, submit credit card information on the application or pay online. 

Membership

2018-2019 Governing Board Election Results

Acting President – Stacy Chase

Vice President

Secretary & Treasurer – Faye Maki

NW Regional Director – Chris Jurney

SW Regional Director – Joe Herrman

SE Regional – Dan Gates


Learn the Law: Tip of the Month

April 25, 2019

Colorado Parks and Wildlife fines, cites CSU professor for illegally trapping birds

Jacy Marmaduke


March 12, 2019

WHAT CAN I DO IF WILDLIFE IS CAUSING DAMAGE ON MY PROPERTY?
Statute 33-6-107(9) and Wildlife Commission Regulations (WCR) 312(C), WCR 323, WCR 1000(A)(6), WCR 17122(C), WCR 17123(A) & WCR 17141(A)

If wildlife is causing damage to crops, real or personal property, or livestock – a person (or any employee or agent of the
landowner) may hunt, trap, or take the following wildlife on lands owned or leased by the person without securing a
license to do so:
• Black-billed Magpies, common crows, starlings, English or house sparrows, common pigeons, coyotes, bobcats, red
foxes, raccoons, jackrabbits, badgers, marmots, prairie dogs, pocket gophers, Richardson’s ground squirrels, rock
squirrels, thirteen-lined ground squirrel, porcupines, crayfish, tiger salamanders, muskrats, beavers, exotic wildlife,
and common snapping turtles.
• Additional species include: tree squirrels, cottontail rabbits, porcupines, bats, mice (except Preble’s meadow jumping
mouse), opossums, voles, rats, and ground squirrels.
• Any person may kill rattlesnakes and skunks when necessary to protect life or property.
• The pelts or hides of any mammal taken under these provisions may be transferred, possessed, traded, bartered, or sold
by any person who holds an appropriate small game or furbearer license. (For information on the possession and/or
disposal of pelts and hides of animals NOT listed above, including bear and lion, please contact CPW for permission.)

February 12, 2019

33-6-130. Explosives, toxicants, and poisons not to be used

(1)  Unless permitted by law or by the division, it is unlawful for any person to use toxicants, poisons, drugs, dynamite, explosives, or any stupefying substances for the purpose of hunting, taking, or harassing any wildlife. Any person who violates this subsection (1) is guilty of a misdemeanor and, upon conviction thereof, shall be punished by a fine of two hundred dollars and an assessment of twenty license suspension points.
 
(2)  The division shall cooperate with the department of agriculture in developing policies and procedures for the issuance by said department of permits for the use of poison by livestock owners or operators.

Jan 10, 2019

WHICH WILDLIFE SPECIES CAN I RELOCATE WITHOUT A PERMIT? WCR 303(A)(3) Tree squirrels, cottontail rabbits and raccoons can be relocated without a permit, provided that: • CPW has been notified in advance. • The relocation site is appropriate habitat for the species. • Permission has been obtained from the landowner or managing agency where the animal will be released. • The relocation must occur within 10 miles of the capture site for squirrels and rabbits and within 2 miles for raccoons.

WHAT IF I WANT TO RELOCATE AN ANIMAL OTHER THAN TREE SQUIRRELS, COTTONTAIL RABBITS OR RACCOONS? WCR 303(A)(3) & WCR 304(E) If you want to relocate any other species, you must first obtain a Relocation Permit from CPW.

Dec 17, 2018

§ 33-6-114. Transportation, importation, exportation, and release of wildlife

(1) It is unlawful for any person to transport or to export any wildlife or portion thereof within or from this state except in accordance with the rules or regulations of the commission.

(2) It is unlawful for any person to import any live wildlife into this state unless an importation license is obtained prior to importation, a current and valid health certificate accompanies each shipment, and such importation is in accordance with the rules and regulations of the commission.

(3) It is unlawful for any person to release, or knowingly allow the escape of, any live native or nonnative or exotic wildlife in Colorado except in accordance with the rules and regulations of the commission.

(3.5) This section does not apply to the transportation, importation, exportation, and release of live native or nonnative fish or viable gametes (eggs and sperm) which are governed by section 33-6-114.5.

(4) Any person who violates this section is guilty of a misdemeanor and, upon conviction thereof, shall be punished by a fine of fifty dollars for violations involving native wildlife and by a fine of not less than two hundred fifty dollars nor more than one thousand dollars for violations involving nonnative or exotic wildlife. In addition, for violations involving either native wildlife or nonnative or exotic wildlife, five license suspension points per incident may be assessed by the division against an individual’s license privileges.

(5) This section shall not apply to aquatic nuisance species, which shall be governed by article 10.5 of this title.

CREDIT(S)

Repealed and reenacted by Laws 1984, S.B.78, § 1, eff. Jan. 1, 1985. Amended by Laws 1990, S.B.90-67, § 5, eff. July 1, 1990; Laws 1990, S.B.90-137, § 4, eff. July 1, 1990; Laws 2008, Ch. 340, § 3, eff. May 29, 2008.

Dec 12, 2018

§ 33-6-115. Theft of wildlife–tampering with trap

(1) It is unlawful for any person to take from another person, without his permission, any wildlife lawfully acquired and possessed by him. Any person who violates this subsection (1) is guilty of a misdemeanor and, upon conviction thereof, shall be punished by a fine of not less than one hundred dollars nor more than five hundred dollars and an assessment of twenty license suspension points. Any person having wildlife taken from him unlawfully as prohibited in this subsection (1) shall be entitled to compensation as ordered by the court.

(2) It is unlawful for any person to interfere with, disturb, remove, or otherwise tamper with any trap, snare, or other device that has been legally set. Any person who violates this subsection (2) is guilty of a misdemeanor and, upon conviction thereof, shall be punished by a fine of two hundred dollars and an assessment of ten license suspension points.


Safety Warning

Counterfeit & Altered Respirators: The Importance of Checking for NIOSH Certification

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration, also known as OSHA, permits only NIOSH-certified respirators to be used to protect workers. The issue of counterfeit and altered respirators is of increasing concern to NIOSH and OSHA. Counterfeit respirators are products that are falsely marketed and sold as being NIOSH-certified and may not be capable of providing appropriate respiratory protection to workers. Altered respirators are non-approved modifications to a NIOSH-certified respirator. These modifications include using replacement parts that are not original manufacturer parts or modifying a certified respirator in a non-approved manner. More Information